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My issue in the 100m
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Angelo Z
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PostPosted: Wed Jun 25, 2008 7:14 am    Post subject: My issue in the 100m Reply with quote

Here is the problem, I reach my top speed too fast. I am ahead of everyone by a 3-5 strides in the first 4 seconds but then my speed declines for the rest of the distance, and they make it past me, reaching their top speed just after I slowed down. Any tips?
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Dan
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PostPosted: Wed Jun 25, 2008 7:51 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:
I am ahead of everyone by a 3-5 strides in the first 4 seconds

That's impossible unless you're racing people that are on crutches...

Dan
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Sprint X
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PostPosted: Wed Jun 25, 2008 5:04 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Laughing Dan does have a point. I suppose you perceive your early lead as strides as opposed to feet!

One might want to observe length and frequency of stride during the acceleration phase and reassure that during transition and onset of top speed you are within optimal levels for both.

SL/SF pattern practitioners such as Wells, Anderson, Seagrave, to name a few have acquired certain degrees of success attempting to optimize and prove more efficient in this manner for their athletes over the years.
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Dan
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PostPosted: Wed Jun 25, 2008 6:28 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

The common mistake is to over-stride at the start, draining lots of late-race energy.

Dan
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Angelo Z
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PostPosted: Thu Jun 26, 2008 1:57 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I think that's what I must be doing the whole time. I put it all in the beginning blasting off the line, and then I end up overstriding towards the finish like I lost all of that momentum. I've been trying to use the pro sprinting technique by running with your head down like Usain, and Asafa do but what is the reason to do so?
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Angelo Z
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PostPosted: Thu Jun 26, 2008 1:59 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Dan wrote:
Quote:
I am ahead of everyone by a 3-5 strides in the first 4 seconds

That's impossible unless you're racing people that are on crutches...

Dan


I am about 2m ahead of people, and what many amateurs don't know what to do is to use their toes in sprinting.

As a distance runner I think it makes sense that I put more into strides than feet? If you look at any long distance event, every last lap they take huge strides, it makes them look like their moving fast, but their legs move slowly.
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Dan
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PostPosted: Thu Jun 26, 2008 12:51 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Head down keeps the pelvis rotated in underneath the torso for a better drive angle, and has the added benefit of keeping you from focusing too far down the track.

Dan
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Angelo Z
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PostPosted: Sat Jun 28, 2008 4:24 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I've been doing some 100s like that today with my head down to get the technique. I took the advice of putting speed in the feet instead of stride distance, and for the first 50 meters or so, I would be digging into the ground with my toes with my head down before extended my stride distance. I could tell I felt a significant change in my speed. I also have another question, is height really that important in the 100m or just overrated?
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PostPosted: Tue Jul 01, 2008 11:30 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Instead of trying to keep your head down, focus on keeping your head and neck in line with your back/spine and driving leg as you drive out for the first 15-20m.

Height is not so important, stride length in relation to leg length is good to look at.
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Angelo Z
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PostPosted: Tue Jul 01, 2008 12:16 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

It must be extremely hard to find just the right relation because we're talking about milliseconds here. Doesn't the whole alignment deal with drive angle?
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Angelo Z
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PostPosted: Sat Aug 16, 2008 5:03 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Then tell me what differs Usain Bolt, Tyson Gay, and Asafa Powell from most elite sprinters. They have astounding times and everyone refers to them as the planet's fastest men, and indeed they are. I'm also curious about comparing Jesse Owens to Bolt in terms of sprint mechanics. From what I've been watching, today's sprinters have higher top end speed than those in the past. The ones in the past always looked like they were slowing down on the last 40 meters.
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•London 2012 XXX Olympiad•
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Angelo Z
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PostPosted: Sat Aug 16, 2008 5:32 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I was reading a little further through the sprint central and I came across a comment that I would've never guessed-that the difference between a fast and slow person genetically are the composition of fast and slow twitch muscle fibers. As a distance runner, does one turn his fast twitch muscle fibers into slow twitch, or are they completely separate, meaning that you can add on either. I decided to ask this in a more simple way so here it is: sprinters have 10 fast twitch muscle fibers and 5 slow twitch while distance runners have 10 slow twitch muscle fibers, and 5 fast twitch. Can the distance runner gain 5 more fast twitch muscle fibers to match that of the sprinter's? I mean what can I say, extra fibers mean extra muscle which means it's a huge problem for distance runners. From previous experiences going back by 8 or so years, I've always had superb stamina and speed, but I've always had trouble with bulking. I've never really specifically trained for sprinting, but I've almost made into the 11 second range without knowing proper sprint mechanics, etc. However, I was beaten on the last 30 meters by a kid whose always been known to be great at sprinting. My main interest is to maximize my 200m and 100m speeds as much as possible as a distance runner, and I don't just mean to have superior speed over other distance runners, but my thinking is way beyond that.
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